Some of the best “corporate storytelling” is coming out of India

Some of the best “corporate storytelling” is coming out of India

The most valuable companies in India include Tata Sons, Aditya Birla and Godrej. The most valuable in the world are Apple, Alphabet (Google), Amazon, Facebook and Microsoft (with the order changing every now and then). These companies cover a wide range of sectors but there is one common element. A consistent and strategic content narrative.

That’s an area well understood by Mumbai-based The Information Company (TIC) which is positioned as a “content, creative and digital agency preferred by India’s leading corporates”.

Corporate Storytellers. That’s how they like to be known.

The Information Company – Storytellers to India Inc

TIC started in 1999 and I have known them since 2004, when I connected with Founder Kiron Kasbekar, formerly Editor of The Economic Times (Bombay), Business Editor of The Times of India, and Managing Editor of Business India.

TIC has been ‘living and breathing’ content for more than 20 years, with its foundations built by top-notch journalists who brought their expertise in impactful storytelling to the game. Since then, TIC has added technologists, graphic designers, writers, videographers, and SEO specialists to the mix to execute great communication projects.

Their storytelling services are being used by the some of India’s largest, most influential, and best brands – Tata Sons, Aditya Birla Group, Godrej, Mahindra Group, Ambuja Cement, Hindalco, Fino, Cipla, Arcelor Mittal Nippon Steel, Capgemini, Weber Shandwick, and many more.

Storytelling for a purpose

TIC doesn’t just tell stories – the focus on storytelling towards a purpose, whether that is building digital brand identity, promoting business interests, creating perceptions, or reaching out to stakeholders.

Thought Leadership

One of the most unleveraged areas of communication is ‘thought leadership’, with much of it being overt promotion or semi-advertising. Here, TIC has been able to carve out a niche – crafting the voices of corporate brand and corporate leaders, and delivering good thought leadership content that is credible, engaging, accurate and consistent.

One of their unique skills is to write authored articles on behalf clients across industries such as automotive, aviation, chemical, consumer products, energy, engineering, IT, insurance, oil & gas, pharma, mining, manufacturing and infrastructure.

Blogs for Interaction

Blogs is another area where, for many organisations, things go wrong. The most common mistake is to come across as self-promoting. Or the organisation starts a blog but tires of it – so their latest blog is two or three years ago. Not a good look.

But the blog can be immensely valuable – it is the one platform for any company to connect with all its stakeholders, interact with them, connect like-minded enthusiasts and so on – through focused storytelling. No wonder then that TIC creates over 30 blogs every month.

Websites that just don’t sit there

Owned communication assets such as websites should not be static – they need to be information rich, and continually updated. They are the first stop for information that is used by investors, clients, media, prospective customers, prospective employees, regulatory bodies. The website is a critical and strategic asset to broadcast the corporate narrative.

Tata Chemicals, Tata Trusts, Rallis, Lupin, Hindalco, Ambuja Cement Foundation, and Suzlon are just some of TIC’s website clients. And this does not include the list of intranet clients!

Visual storytelling

Sometimes, a visual story tells more than a thousand words. Infographics are mostly data driven – the magic lies in crafting a coherent story around data.

By writing compelling text and presenting it in an efficient and visually pleasing manner, TIC ensures that an engaging story emerges from each Infographic. This form of content is its way, both art and science.

Campaigns – traction and reaction

Engaging with employees – especially in an age of WFH – has taken on a new significance. Companies often rely on emailer campaigns to connect. But how do we gain traction and reaction?

Whether the campaign is to showcase business achievements, announce a product launch or an event, highlight business achievement, connect with employees or other stakeholders, TIC partners several big corporates to put in the right words to their thoughts.

Social media campaigns take the need for creativity to another level. Here too TIC builds award-winning strategic campaigns for clients such as Godrej and Hindalco.

Video now “most effective”

If a picture is worth a thousand words, a video is worth 1.8 million – that is the view of TIC, and they see video as “the most effective way to narrate a story”. Be it explainer, animated, VFX, event, HR videos or corporate films, TIC creates videos for Aditya Birla Group, Sterling & Wilson, Asian Paints, and Hindalco.

Content Overload

Beware of stepping into ‘content overload’, a sign of our times. How do you ensure ‘thumb-stopping’, shareworthy content for your brand? One easy hack is to make sure the content is dynamic, visually rich and – most important – interactive! Adding a layer of interactivity to your content – blogs, posts, videos, graphics, podcasts, whatever – will add to brand recall and engagement. Even a simple quiz, for instance, becomes interactive content and can be a game changer for your brand. And that is what TIC delivers.

Awards tell the story

Recognition is the best sequel to creativity. TIC has won a slew of awards for its work – here is just a tiny fraction of the recent accolades won:

  • Double Platinum at the ‘AVA Digital Awards 2022’ for Tata Sons e-magazine and a video for Sterling & Wilson Renewable Energy Ltd
  • ‘Mint Marketing Award 2021’ for Hindalco’s #WomenAtHindalco social media campaign
  • Gold for Hindalco’s internal newsletter at the ‘Afaqs! Digies 2021’
  • Bronze for Aditya Birla Group’s #HaathUthanaZarooriHai video at the ‘Velocity Awards’
  • Best Content agency at ‘The Great Indian Content Marketing Awards 2021’

Contact TIC

For more on how TIC can support your communication objectives, just drop a message on enquiry@ticworks.com. Or better still, call at +91 842 581 4016 / 17.

https://www.ticworks.com/

India-Australia trade deal – a handy list of features

Indian Commerce Minister Piyush Goyal is negotiating multiple trade deals

Benefits of AI Economic Cooperation and Trade Agreement include:

  • Sheep meat tariffs of 30 per cent will be eliminated on entry into force, providing a boost for Australian exports that already command nearly 20 per cent of India’s market
  • Wool will have the current 2.5 per cent tariffs eliminated on entry into force, supporting Australia’s second-largest market for wool products.
  • Tariffs on wine with a minimum import price of US$5 per bottle will be reduced from 150 per cent to 100 per cent on entry into force and subsequently to 50 per cent over 10 years (based on Indian wholesale price index for wine).
  • Tariffs on wine bottles with minimum import price of US$15 will be reduced from 150 per cent to 75 per cent on entry into force and subsequently to 25 per cent over 10 years (based on Indian wholesale price index for wine).
  • Tariffs up to 30 per cent on avocados, onions, broad, kidney and adzuki beans, cherries, shelled pistachios, macadamias, cashews in-shell, blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, currants will be eliminated over seven years.
  • Tariffs on almonds, lentils, oranges, mandarins, pears, apricots and strawberries will be reduced, improving opportunities for Australia’s horticulture industry to supply India’s growing food demand.
  • The resources sector will benefit from the elimination of tariffs on entry into force for coal, alumina, metallic ores, including manganese, copper and nickel; and critical minerals including titanium and zirconium.
  • LNG tariffs will be bound at 0 per cent at entry into force.
  • Tariffs on pharmaceutical products and certain medical devices will be eliminated over five and seven years.

Wow! India Australia trade deal much bigger than we thought

These two Ministers are transforming the Australia-India relationship

Wow! The Australia-India Economic Cooperation and Trade Agreement signed yesterday is a whopper.

Get on the plane now if you are in business or education! The trade and investment doors are open for you.

The two trade ministers, Australian Dan Tehan and Indian Piyush Goyal, are transforming the economic relationship and created a platform for decades of growth for India and Australia. Well done.

READ MORE DETAIL HERE:

https://www.trademinister.gov.au/minister/dan-tehan/media-release/historic-trade-deal-india

Welcome back as Indian and international students return to Melbourne

Indian students are coming back to Melbourne at the rate of 4,000 per week

India is now the number one country of origin for foreign students in Victoria, and the students are back!

Welcome back – international students contribute to making Melbourne the diverse and active city that we love!

About 4000 international students are still arriving each week, as some students report delays in having their visa approved.

Universities and student accommodation providers are preparing for a “better-than-expected” return of internationals arriving to study in Melbourne.

People from India make up a quarter of the 96,300 international student visa holders currently in Victoria, followed by those from China on 19 per cent and Nepal on 7 per cent.

Victoria’s international student contingent has risen to 96,300 this month, after dropping from 151,500 before the pandemic to a low of 68,400 in December 2021.

9 Key Factors to Winning in India

Follow the lead of successful businesses who have advanced by integrating Indian culture and values into their offering.

  1. Abandon the “quick sale” old mindset and adopt patience and a long-term view.
  2. Model your business on Macquarie Bank – this works whether you are a large or small enterprise. Their central plank for India was partnering is the key to success.
  3. Abhishek Poddar, Managing Director, Macquarie Infrastructure and Real Assets (MIRA) “India is one market where you need deep experience if you’re going to be successful. You have to take the time to appreciate and understand its unique culture and ways of working.”
  4. Be clear about what India wants. Macquarie saw infrastructure and clean energy opportunities and focused just on them.
  5. Most successful businesses in India have some philanthropic activity – this is highly worthwhile and well regarded in India.
  6. Establish good relations with Government at Central and State levels – this is vital to being accepted in India.
  7. Consider options such as acquisitions and partnerships which can speed up your market acceptance.   
  8. Be there for the long haul – Deakin University continues to make gains in India and has been present there for over 25 years.
  9. Develop a local Indian team and allow them to apply their own culture – within your larger business culture.

India has the largest child population – a market hungry for product

India has the largest child population globally – 125-150 million in the age group up to 4 years.

With increasing numbers of Indian women in employment, rising awareness of child nutrition and rapid urbanisation, the paediatric nutrition category presents a significant growth opportunity.

Opportunities include child products in health, wellness and nutrition space – encompassing wellness nutrition as well as disease specific nutrition and our consumer brands.

Add to this education and learning, toys, clothing and much more.

The Demographic Dividend

In a favourable development for India, the growth in India’s working age population (people between 15 and 64 years of age) is outnumbering the growth in its dependant population. Children aged 14 or below as well as people aged above 65 years fall under the latter category.

This surge in the working-age population is expected to last for a total spell of 37 years, until 2055.

According to studies, such a phase is usually accompanied by a rapid economic growth.

India’s middle class and wealthy consumers – the facts reveal why you should engage with India

Conservative figures put the Indian middle class at 228 million

How big is India’s middle and wealthy class? And where are they?

Although this information is essential to your India engagement strategy, until now the answers have really only been speculation.

Lack of data continues to be a challenge, and estimates can vary wildly.

So, INTO INDIA brings you some numbers robust enough for you to use in your planning.

While some estimates put the middle class at 500 million or more, using a much tighter definition of middle class, Hurun Research produced much smaller numbers than most. They defined middle class as households who have more than over A$4,682 per year to spend on housing, travel, cars, education and products. These numbers found 57 million Indian households in the combined class of middle class and wealthy. Now, assuming each household might be four people, that becomes 228 million people.

Things are changing so fast that researchers have added a new category – the “New Middle Class”. In 2021 this new group was 633,000 households – around 2.5 million individuals. Who is in this group? It is those households who have approximately A$37,500 per year to spend on housing, travel, cars, education and products – a very exciting market!

Most of my research – but not all of it – comes from the Hurun Report, a leading research, luxury publishing and events group established in London in 1998 with presence in India, China, France, UK, USA, Australia, Japan, Canada and Luxembourg. It is widely recognized world-over for its comprehensive evaluation of the wealthiest individuals across the globe.

There are 412,000 dollar-millionaire households/affluent households in India with a networth of at least US$1 million.

Hurun Rich Listers have a wealth of Rs 1,000 crore (142 million), the report says, and pegs the number of such cumulative households in India at 3,000.

At the other end of the spectrum is the ‘Indian middle class’ that has earnings of over Rs 2.5-lakh per annum (over A$4,682) and a net worth of less than Rs 7 crore (A$1.3 million). 56,400,000 families in India fall under this category – approximately 224 million individuals.

The McKinsey Global Institute, which defines India’s middle class as households with real annual disposable incomes between 200,000 and 1 million rupees (US$3,606 to $18,031), estimates the ranks of middle class will more than double by 2025 to 583 million—41 percent of the population.

Where are they?

The top 10 states home to 70.3 per cent of millionaire households in India are Maharashtra (capital is Mumbai) has the highest number of millionaires (56,000), followed by Uttar Pradesh (36,000), Tamil Nadu (35,000), Karnataka (33,000) and Gujarat (29,000). City-wise, Mumbai is home to most millionaires (16,933), followed by Delhi (16,000), Kolkata (10,000), Bengaluru (7,582) and Chennai (4,685).

Aslany, who published a study on the Indian middle class in 2019, found that contrary to most assumptions, a significant segment of the Indian middle class resides in rural areas. About 28.05% of India’s population was middle class, Aslany found, adding that 52.31% of the lower middle class, more than 32% of the comfortable middle class, and more than 23% of the upper-middle class was in rural India. Most of the lower middle class in rural India are involved in agriculture, he said.

These realistic numbers should excite you to engage with India – right now demand for everything has gone through the roof!

Indian Budget 2022 – 6 takeaways

Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman delivers the 2022 Indian Budget

Finance Minister, Nirmala Sitharaman has delivered the 2022 Indian Budget – here are my 6 takeaways:

India is the fastest-growing large economy

At 9.2% for 2021-2022, India’s GDP growth will be the fastest of all the large economies.

Launching a digital currency

Indian minister’s 2022 budget speech focused on various incentives to boost India’s digital economy, including the launch of a digital rupee within 2022. Minister Sitharaman noted that the central bank digital currency will “give a big boost to the digital economy and lead to a more efficient and cheaper currency management system.”

India is going green

Calling climate change one of the highest external risks facing the country and the green economy a sunrise economy, the finance minister presented multiple proposals and pathways to climate action across different sectors. These include raising climate finance and developing greener public transportation.

Emphasizing inclusive development

The pandemic financially hurt millions of Indian families and analysts have warned against the threat of growing inequality amidst the pandemic. Prime Minister Modi’s government has, since 2014, laid a strong focus on citizen empowerment. India 2022 budget aims to expand its support for Indians, particularly vulnerable groups such as girls, women, senior citizens and farmers. The budget expands social welfare support, while economically empowering marginalised groups through job creation.

Expanding education and mental health care

The pandemic has meant that many Indian school children have lost up to 2 years of valuable schooling. Major educational programs include expanded digital tools for schools in remote regions.

In a significant move, Minister Sitharaman announced the launch of a National Tele-Mental Health Programme, which, built around 23 core health centres, will provide citizens with access to quality mental health counselling and care services.

But Covid is the big concern this year

With a new growth in Covid numbers, there is growing concern that the pandemic could hit India big again this year and could impact the budget numbers.

Great next era for India-Australia, says Hall Chadwick

Peter Pryn is a regular visitor to India and assists market entry for both India and Australia

As we approach Indian Republic Day and Australia Day – both on 26 January – here is a great message from my good friend Peter Pryn, Director of Hall Chadwick. This firm has a long commitment to building India-Australia business relations.

Change brings opportunity

This year, we see there to be great opportunities for international enterprises entering the Australian market. While there are niggling concerns about the Omicron variant, the post-COVID landscape is certainly one of rapid technological change, a transformational shakeup of global trading norms has occurred and there is an increasing focus on sustainable business. There is no doubt the way Australian business manage supply chains and source skilled staff has changed over the last two years. We see our clients, irrespective of scale, continue to look at ways to minimize supply chain interruptions to achieve an acceptable level of profitability.

Looking ahead: India – Australia relations

The Australian economy is very strong and the trend of high levels of foreign investment is forecast to continue. Along with a further easing of border restrictions in 2022, we are likely see a more aggressive migration program to catch up on lost population growth. This could be announced in the Federal Budget in May. We hope to see an expansive trade partnership (CECA) between India and Australia come to fruition before year-end. In a joint statement from Ministers Mr. Piyush Goyal and Mr. Dan Tehan last December, officials have been directed to speed up the negotiations.

These are all signs of a great next era in India – Australia business relations. We encourage you to start a conversation with us about opportunities to collaborate on business initiatives in 2022. 

We wish you all the best for your Republic Day and the year ahead.

Peter Pryn

Director

+61 3 9820 6400
  ppryn@hallchadwickmelb.com.au

More good news! Consider Bangladesh – which for many symbolises everything wrong with the world – take another look

Literacy in Bangladesh jumped from 35% to 74%

Bangladesh, home to 160 million people, for many people in the west is a symbol of everything wrong with the unequal world.

But take another look.

It celebrated a ‘development miracle’ in 2021, its 50th year of independence. In the last three decades, GDP per capita has increased seven fold, 24 million people have been lifted out of poverty, life expectancy has risen to 73 years, infant and maternal mortality rates have fallen by a factor of five, the literacy rate has increased from 35% to 74%, and more than 97% of the population now has access to electricity, up from 62% in 2014.

Worth going over that again – it is genuine good news.