India’s YOUTH BOOM will reshape the world

These are the priorities of Indian Gen Z and Millennials.

Most of the world’s young people live in India.

And India next month becomes the most populous nation on earth, passing China.

India’s YOUTH BOOM looks like this:

440 million Millennials (born between 1981 and 1996)

375 million Gen Z (born between 1997 and 2012)

There are two things we need to know about these generations.

First, they are hard working and earning better than their elders. A high percentage of them have a second job.

Second, they are big spenders, so their capacity to shape and influence us all is enormous.

So, getting your product or service into India right now would make great business sense.

And countries, like Australia, are busy building closer political and strategic ties with India. Makes sense – it will be the economic (and therefore cultural etc) driver of the future.

Time for Australian business and education to find a way to increase trade with India

Dr Ashok Sharma has written about the increasingly close relations of India and Australia – for example, we are now the number 2 education market behind the USA and just ahead of the UK. Dr Sharma pointed to the Comprehensive Strategic Partnership and the New Education Policy which should “bring the current education partnership to the next level”.

But what about other areas of trade?

We know that the increasing activity in education has many spin offs – increased tourism, professional exchanges and more.

Education might be the “trade flagship” that drags other industries into the trade mix.

But we cannot be sure.

It is time for a new national conversation about Australia-India trade, with a close examination on what blockages might exist and what steps would increase two-way trade.

India’s External Affairs Minister Dr. S. Jaishankar (pictured with Acting Prime Minister Richard Marles) came to Australia in October for the annual Foreign Ministers’ Framework Dialogue – where these matters were discussed.

The two foreign ministers discussed “accelerating and deepening economic ties, including through our Economic Cooperation and Trade Agreement.”

Sounds good.

But what is next?

Can the Australian Trade Minister, the Hon Don Farrell, bring business and education at all levels together in a national dialogue?

Remember – India is not just the second most populous nation on earth, it is also the YOUNGEST – which makes it the global growth centre. We cannot afford to miss this opportunity.

We have to find a way.

6 tips for doing business with India

You have to establish a presence to do well in India

Be There

Fly in Fly Out does not work long term in India – naturally, Indians like to see that you are serious and that means having a local presence. Does not have to be big, but it has to be local.

Be Indian

As soon as you can, find a local Indian leader or team that can do two things – work with you plus take you into the Indian market.

Blend with Indian culture

We all love our “corporate culture”, but you might need to bend a little, blend a little to produce something right for India.

“Indianise” your product or service

Innovate, repackage, find new markets for what you do, accept technical innovations from within India – “Indianise”.

Be a Presence

Participate in local chambers and industry groups – the collective is so much more important in India and you need to find a way to “be a presence”.

Get support in India

Australia has some of the best people ready to help you – State Government Business Offices, Austrade – start talking to them early and keep the links going. They can be your best resource.

India and China – a simple comparison

The Indian economy is expected to grow by 7.3% in the current fiscal year, which ends in March.

China is expected to grow by 2%.

Population of China is 1.4 billion (approx), ageing and declining.

Population of India is 1.4 billion (approx), young and growing.

Indian economy is driven by supplying local demand as the youthful population and middle class growth increase demand.

Chinese economic growth has largely been driven by making and exporting.

India as a domestic demand-driven economy – is less sensitive to global downturns.

China is an export driven economy – highly sensitive to global downturns.

And we have not even got onto world’s largest democracy, innovative driven, attracting and welcoming western investment and more…

Compare the two – what do you think?

Read the best short summary of why India is the bright spot economically

This is one of the best summaries of why India should be on your business and trade radar.

My good friend Hareesh Tibrewala provides the great summary – he is the Author of ‘If I Had To Do It Again’, a Social Media Strategist and Internet Entrepreneur – currently Joint CEO of Mirum India.  

“Right now the Indian economy seems like the brightest spot among all large economies.

“One one hand, the whole of Europe is suffering the brunt of the Ukraine war. And irrespective of sanctions against Russia, and who is winning or losing the war, the brunt is actually being faced by Europe in form of inflation and energy issues.

“On the other hand, the US seems to be struggling to come out of Covid. There are just no people anywhere to fill in the job vacancies. Every shop or outlet has “Hiring” signs in their window. And salary levels, even for minimum wage kind of jobs seems to have increased dramatically.

“And finally China, who was powering the world economy for the past few decades seems to be floundering thanks to zero-covid policy and an unprecendented drought.

“Overall the APAC region, and specifically India, seem to be comparatively doing much better and seem stable.”

Thanks Hareesh – well said!

How fast is India changing? It is about to become the largest producer of steel on the planet

INTO INDIA has written about the extraordinary transformation that is happening in the “New India” – airports, roads, ports, urban renewal, smart cities, shopping malls, digitisation and online shopping.

But is is truly stunning to hear that India is right on the verge of being the biggest steel producer in the world.

On August 23, Minister of Civil Aviation and Steel, Mr. Jyotiraditya Scindia, stated that India would soon become the world’s top steel producer. The Minister was addressing an NMDC and FICCI-organized conference on the Indian minerals and metals business. After China, India is the second-largest producer of crude steel worldwide.

He believed that India had switched from being a net steel importer to an exporter of steel. According to him, India now consumes 78 kg of steel per person, up from 57.8 kg in 2013–14. By 2030, the government wants to produce 300 million tonnes (MT) of steel, according to Mr. Scindia.

READ MORE:

https://www.ndtv.com/business/india-to-become-worlds-number-one-producer-of-steel-union-minister-jyotiraditya-m-scindia-3278800

Some straight talking on climate change and public policy

Patrick Suckling presents the clearest short paper on climate change and what we urgently need to do

Patrick Suckling is a non-resident Senior Fellow of Asia Society Policy Institute and former Australian Ambassador for the Environment – and former Australian High Commissioner to India.

He has written one of the clearest – and briefest – papers on the importance of climate change and how we need to respond.

Highly recommended reading –

India an attractive market for global consumer firms

Around a dozen global consumer-facing companies reported robust growth in India in the January to March quarter, surpassing even pre-Covid levels with a high double-digit rate for several.

India is among the top-performing areas for several of these firms, including Unilever, Visa, Whirlpool, and Pernod.

Companies sold inventory amid increased Covid-19 instances and municipal restrictions, resulting in large discounts on some discretionary products such as apparel and shoes across platforms throughout the country. Several CEOs have also stated that they are increasing their investment in India.

Sales of everyday household products and basics grew mostly owing to price increases, as corporations raised prices to offset rising raw material, energy, packaging, and transportation costs.

https://www.ibef.org/news/india-is-shining-now-for-global-consumer-firms

India riding high – exports pass US$400 billion for the first time

Prime Minister Mr. Narendra Modi has announced that India had passed the US$ 400 billion mark in goods exports for the first time, calling it a “key milestone” for his government’s Aatmanirbhar Bharat (Made in India) initiative for manufacturing self-sufficiency.

He made the statement as India’s services and industrial activities remained stable in February, despite the fact that the crisis in Ukraine has clouded the outlook for prices and growth in the consumer-driven economy.

“India set an ambitious target of US$ 400 billion of goods exports & achieves this target for the first time ever. I congratulate our farmers, weavers, MSMEs, manufacturers, exporters for this success,” he said posting a graphic showing the target being met nine days ahead of the deadline.

Time to upgrade your India market entry strategy?

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/business/india-business/explained-in-charts-how-india-achieved-400-billion-export-target/articleshow/90398092.cms

Indian startups raised $38 billion in 2021: Entrackr report

I want to thank my friend Gopi Shankar for drawing my attention to this stunning development for Indian startups. Gopi is based in Bangalore (Bengaluru) and is Director – Trade & Industry | Global Victoria, Victorian Government Trade and Investment.

Entrackr reports:

Money flowed into Indian startups in 2021 like never before. The ecosystem broke all the previous records in terms of fundraising and minting unicorns during the 12 month–period. According to data compiled by Fintrackr, total investments that flowed into Indian startups stood close to $38 billion in 2021. This is over three times more than the $11.1 billion in total funding that startups received during 2020.

Fintrackr’s data further shows that 1,391 startups mopped up $37.98 billion across 1,625 deals in 2021 which included 380 growth and late-stage startups and 948 early-stage startups. Among them, 297 startups, mainly early-stage, did not disclose their deal size.

Read the report here:

https://entrackr.com/2022/01/indian-startups-raised-38-billion-in-2021-entrackr-report/

Here are the top performers which gives you some guide to what is hot in India right now: