India’s YOUTH BOOM will reshape the world

These are the priorities of Indian Gen Z and Millennials.

Most of the world’s young people live in India.

And India next month becomes the most populous nation on earth, passing China.

India’s YOUTH BOOM looks like this:

440 million Millennials (born between 1981 and 1996)

375 million Gen Z (born between 1997 and 2012)

There are two things we need to know about these generations.

First, they are hard working and earning better than their elders. A high percentage of them have a second job.

Second, they are big spenders, so their capacity to shape and influence us all is enormous.

So, getting your product or service into India right now would make great business sense.

And countries, like Australia, are busy building closer political and strategic ties with India. Makes sense – it will be the economic (and therefore cultural etc) driver of the future.

Time for Australian business and education to find a way to increase trade with India

Dr Ashok Sharma has written about the increasingly close relations of India and Australia – for example, we are now the number 2 education market behind the USA and just ahead of the UK. Dr Sharma pointed to the Comprehensive Strategic Partnership and the New Education Policy which should “bring the current education partnership to the next level”.

But what about other areas of trade?

We know that the increasing activity in education has many spin offs – increased tourism, professional exchanges and more.

Education might be the “trade flagship” that drags other industries into the trade mix.

But we cannot be sure.

It is time for a new national conversation about Australia-India trade, with a close examination on what blockages might exist and what steps would increase two-way trade.

India’s External Affairs Minister Dr. S. Jaishankar (pictured with Acting Prime Minister Richard Marles) came to Australia in October for the annual Foreign Ministers’ Framework Dialogue – where these matters were discussed.

The two foreign ministers discussed “accelerating and deepening economic ties, including through our Economic Cooperation and Trade Agreement.”

Sounds good.

But what is next?

Can the Australian Trade Minister, the Hon Don Farrell, bring business and education at all levels together in a national dialogue?

Remember – India is not just the second most populous nation on earth, it is also the YOUNGEST – which makes it the global growth centre. We cannot afford to miss this opportunity.

We have to find a way.

6 tips for doing business with India

You have to establish a presence to do well in India

Be There

Fly in Fly Out does not work long term in India – naturally, Indians like to see that you are serious and that means having a local presence. Does not have to be big, but it has to be local.

Be Indian

As soon as you can, find a local Indian leader or team that can do two things – work with you plus take you into the Indian market.

Blend with Indian culture

We all love our “corporate culture”, but you might need to bend a little, blend a little to produce something right for India.

“Indianise” your product or service

Innovate, repackage, find new markets for what you do, accept technical innovations from within India – “Indianise”.

Be a Presence

Participate in local chambers and industry groups – the collective is so much more important in India and you need to find a way to “be a presence”.

Get support in India

Australia has some of the best people ready to help you – State Government Business Offices, Austrade – start talking to them early and keep the links going. They can be your best resource.

India and China – a simple comparison

The Indian economy is expected to grow by 7.3% in the current fiscal year, which ends in March.

China is expected to grow by 2%.

Population of China is 1.4 billion (approx), ageing and declining.

Population of India is 1.4 billion (approx), young and growing.

Indian economy is driven by supplying local demand as the youthful population and middle class growth increase demand.

Chinese economic growth has largely been driven by making and exporting.

India as a domestic demand-driven economy – is less sensitive to global downturns.

China is an export driven economy – highly sensitive to global downturns.

And we have not even got onto world’s largest democracy, innovative driven, attracting and welcoming western investment and more…

Compare the two – what do you think?

India agricultural, processed food products exports up 30% to US$ 9.6 billion in April-July

INTO INDIA has written regularly on agribusiness growth in India – and the opportunities this presents. The story is gathering pace…

India’s exports of processed food and agricultural products increased by 30% to US$ 9.6 billion from April-July of this fiscal year. Fruit and vegetable exports increased by 4% during the time period, according to data from the Directorate General of Commercial Intelligence and Statistics (DGCI&S).

According to a statement released by the Ministry of Commerce & Industry, an export goal of US$ 23.56 billion has been set for the basket of agricultural and processed food goods for 2022–2023.

The first four months of the current fiscal saw a growth of 61.91% in the export of dairy products, reaching US$ 247 million. Basmati rice exports climbed by 29.13%, rising from US$ 1.21 billion in April–July 2021 to US$ 1.56 billion in April–July 2022. Non-Basmati rice exports increased by 9.24% to US$ 2.08 billion in the same time period.

There is a lot happening in the agriculture sector in India – time for you to upgrade your India engagement strategy?

Read more here:

https://www.livemint.com/economy/indias-agricultural-and-processed-food-products-exports-up-by-30-to-9-598-mn-11662993250147.html

Indian consumers are optimistic, even during Covid – McKinsey

A McKinsey survey has found that nearly three-quarters of India’s consumers are optimistic about economic recovery, and net intent to spend is growing and positive across many categories.

Omnichannel usage continues across the majority of categories.

Social-media influence is high, especially for Gen Z and millennials. More than 90 percent are engaging in social media and entertainment platforms.

There is an upward trend for new technology, such as crypto and augmented reality/virtual reality, and consumers intend to continue digital activities as the COVID-19 crisis subsides.

About 40 percent of consumers are engaging in out-of-home activities, especially among the vaccinated segment.

Most consumers have tried new shopping behaviours’ such as new retail outlets and new brands.

https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/growth-marketing-and-sales/our-insights/survey-indian-consumer-sentiment-during-the-coronavirus-crisis

Find the right business partner in India

 One of the most frequent questions for INTO INDIA is how do we find the right business partner in India? Most case studies of Australian businesses succeeding in India reveal one key element – finding the right local partner.

What is the right local partner?

It is much more than someone who says “yes”. Too many have been frustrated in Indian market entry because they forged alliances with any and everyone who said “yes” – which means everyone they meet. India is a culture that cannot say no, so be wary of the yes answer.

The right partner is already active and successful in your field. They can show you their track record.

Your right partner will have connections among suppliers and customers, and will be keen to introduce you to them so you can form your own judgement.

In the collective culture of India, your right partner will be well connected in the various business chambers and will have good connections in government – central and state. This right partner will demonstrate these connections by organising meetings for you, rather than just saying “yes” we are connected.

Your right partner will be someone you double check with Austrade and with other reliable connections you have in India or Australia.

Your right partner could ultimately become an agent, a joint venture or more. They might just be a trusted individual who willingly offers to make connects for you – this freely opening doors does occur in India.

Your right partner might be a talented individual who you hire into your business. Or it might be a combination of external and internal. Patience will be your best friend as you make these choices.

Finally, your right partner will develop relationships for you – because in Indian culture relationships matter. Relationships first, business second is the path to long term business in India. Quick deals are just that – one transaction that might not lead to anything.

So, how are you going finding the right partner in India?
 

5 key tips for succeeding in India

Here’s a big generalisation – almost every product and service can find an eager market in India – the Indian economic growth story means demand for everything cannot be met – so that means opportunity for you.

But how to approach India?

First – think longer term than you normally do, but keep in mind modern India can be either fast or slow and there is no way of predicting.

Second – leave your ego behind. Pretty much every western company that has succeeded in India has done so on the support of a strong local Indian team across all levels. To do this, they have effectively left their ego behind.

Third – India wants your business, NOT your culture. You will struggle if you want to transfer your “culture” to India – putting your expat team in long-term charge of the local team is a risky approach.

Fourth – use your expat team wisely. Expats can come and go as needed – but your business needs longevity in India and that is what an Indian management team can provide.

Fifth – smart companies that go into India also ensure they hire Indians into the Head Office team, at the right level in HO guiding and advising the HO team.

Why has India banned wheat exports?

India – one of the world’s leading wheat producers – has placed an immediate ban on wheat exports.

Why?

As reported in this analysis by SOUTH ASIAN TIMES, the ban serves three main purposes: It maintains the food security for the country, it helps others who are in distress, and maintains India’s reliability as a supplier.

See full report here:

Some straight talking on climate change and public policy

Patrick Suckling presents the clearest short paper on climate change and what we urgently need to do

Patrick Suckling is a non-resident Senior Fellow of Asia Society Policy Institute and former Australian Ambassador for the Environment – and former Australian High Commissioner to India.

He has written one of the clearest – and briefest – papers on the importance of climate change and how we need to respond.

Highly recommended reading –